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Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Thu Dec 24, 2015 11:17 am
by wildrose
Sacred Celtic Trees and Woods
Plants play an important role in many pre-Christian European religions.
To the Celts and many other peoples of the old world, certain trees held special significance as a fuel for heat, cooking, building materials and weaponry. In addition to this however, many woods also provided a powerful spiritual presence. The specific trees varied between different cultures and geographic locations, but those believed to be "sacred" shared certain traits.

Listed on this page are alder, apple, ash, birch, cedar, elm, fir, hazel, holly, oak, pine, willow, yew, etc.
LINK: http://wicca.com/celtic/celtic/sactrees.htm

Re: Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Thu Dec 24, 2015 11:19 am
by wildrose
The Druid Path
Here's some interesting general information about Druidic spirituality.

Re: Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2015 8:53 am
by CoolChick
Druid Plant Orcale Review
I actually got one of these for Winter Solstice. We started celebrating Winter Solstice a few years ago and so we do our present exchange a few days earlier than most people.

Re: Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Sun Feb 07, 2016 6:47 pm
by ergot
Mountain Ash, Rowan
Mountain Ashes (aka, Rowans) are common in North America and Eurasia. According to ancient Celtic tradition the tree had magical properties:
The Celts and other people of early British Isles thought the tree had magical properties. Its powers were to protect you from witchcraft, one of two reasons why it is also called Witchwood. The other reason is a pucker at the end of the fruit reminds some of a pentagram which is associated with witchery.

LINK: http://www.eattheweeds.com/mountain-ash-rowan/

Re: Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Wed Oct 26, 2016 7:27 pm
by wildrose
Mysterious giant Celtic cross growing in Irish forest
Always good to see pre-Christian traditions kept alive and honored!

Re: Sacred Plants

PostPosted: Thu Oct 27, 2016 8:48 am
by ergot
wildrose: Very cool! It seems that a lot of very interesting history was obscured by the invasion of Christianity. I often wonder about how our ancient ancestors lived and what the world would be like if Christianity had vanished away and not spread like a virus up through Europe.